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What Are the T14 Law Schools and Why Should You Know About Them?

T14 refers to the top 14 law schools in U.S. News and World Report‘s annual Best Law Schools rankings. This is the very tip-top of the top law schools, and includes schools such as Harvard Law School, Yale Law School, and Stanford Law School, to name a few. Besides looking pretty great on your resume, gaining admission to one of the schools included in these law school rankings can provide you with enormous advantages in both your law school experience and in your career. Advantages like:

-A more holistic law curriculum that can better prepare you to practice in any state
-Better endowments and summer funding (hello, financial aid!)
-A direct interview and hiring pipeline to the Big Law firms with their current starting salaries of over $200,000 per year

So What Does It Take to Get into a T14 School?

We’ve compiled everything you need to know about the T14 difference, complete with 10 tips to get accepted to a top 14 law school from a Blueprint Admissions Counselor who scored a 180 on his LSAT and was accepted to many of the schools in the T14 ranking.

Get Your Free Top Law School Guide!

Download The Blueprint Prep Guide to Getting Into the T-14 Law Schools for a look at the key advantages these top law schools offer and the actions you can take to get accepted, including:

-How a T-14 can make a difference in your law school experience and employment opportunities after graduation.

-Determining your career goals within the legal field and how a T-14 can support them.

-Standing out with your LSAT and GPA.

-Demonstrating your professional fitness and potential as a lawyer.

-Relating as a real person, not just a law student, to the law school admissions committee.

-How to identify and overcome any weaknesses as an applicant to a T-14 school.

Note: At Blueprint, we believe every student should strive to go to the best law school they can. However, we also know it’s not necessary to attend a T-14 school. Use this guide as a way to think critically about what type of law school is best for you.